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Table 1 Semi-structured interview guide

From: General practitioners’ views on managing knee osteoarthritis: a thematic analysis of factors influencing clinical practice guideline implementation in primary care

Key activity Questions and potential probes
GP makes, communicates and documents a diagnosis of osteoarthritis clinically (without imaging) How do you currently arrive at a diagnosis of knee OA?
Are you aware that guidelines recommend making a diagnosis clinically and without imaging?
How do you feel about making a clinical diagnosis of knee OA (without imaging)?
What would you or GPs in general need to know more about in order to be comfortable with making a clinical diagnosis of knee OA?
What would help encourage or support GPs in making a clinical diagnosis of knee OA?
How do you think receiving a diagnosis of knee OA impacts on patients?
Are there any issues around patient expectations that influence how you diagnose knee OA and how you communicate the diagnosis with patients?
Do you currently document diagnosis of “knee OA” in patients’ records?
GP provides education/advice to patients about the importance of general physical activity and regular strengthening and/or aerobic exercise during the consultation which is reinforced at later opportunities. What physical activity or exercise advice do you currently give to patients with knee OA?
How confident do you feel when giving this advice?
How important do you think it is to talk to your knee OA patients about physical activity and strengthening exercises?
How do you think this information impacts on patients?
Do you think GPs are familiar with the latest recommendations for physical activity in general and for exercise specifically for people with knee OA?
Are there any additional skills or training that you would like to have regarding physical activity or exercise advice?
Are there any other things that make it difficult for GPs to give this advice?
Can you suggest any measures that would assist or support GPs in discussing general physical activity and targeted exercises with their knee OA patients?
GP provides education/advice to patients either about the importance of maintaining a healthy weight or weight loss in the initial consultation which is reinforced at later opportunities (includes BMI measurement) What weight management advice do you currently give to patients with knee OA?
How important do you think weight loss is for knee OA symptoms?
How confident do you feel when giving weight loss advice?
How do you think this information impacts on patients?
Do you think GPs feel motivated to talk to patients about weight management / weight loss? What would increase or decrease their motivation?
Are there any other things that make it difficult for GPs to give effective weight loss advice?
Can you suggest any measures that would assist or support GPs in talking to patients about weight management / weight loss?
Do you currently assess BMI with your knee OA patients?
How important is it that GPs assess BMI for knee OA patients?
What, if any, are the benefits to patients?
If you think GPs do not currently routinely assess BMI, what are the reasons for this? What shift of thinking is required?
What help or support would make it easier for GPs to assess BMI for their knee OA patients?
Are there any issues around patient expectation that influence whether BMI is assessed?